Sonia Rykiel, 1930- 2016

Sonia Rykiel by Dominique Issermann, 1980.  Image GETTY IMAGES

Sonia Rykiel by Dominique Issermann, 1980. Image GETTY IMAGES

It’s truly heartbreaking news when a monumentally talented person passes away. French designer Sonia Rykiel died on the morning of August 25th at her home in Paris from the effects of Parkinson’ Disease. She was 86 years old. She’d been battling with her illness for almost two decades, but it’s still shocking news for me to digest. You just can’t imagine someone like her dying. She was a woman who was always appeared happy, emblematic and full of energy- someone bursting with life- and it’s quite hard to imagine the fashion world without her.

Sonia Rykiel, Polaroid by Andy Warhol, 1986.  Image THEREDLIST.COM

Sonia Rykiel, Polaroid by Andy Warhol, 1986. Image THEREDLIST.COM

Sonia Rykiel was born Sonia Fils in Neuilly-sur-Seine on 25 May 1930. She was raised in a mixed Romanian- Russian Jewish household, and was the eldest of five sisters. She started working in fashion in her teens, when she was hired to dress the windows of a Parisian textile store at the age of 17. In her early 20s, she married Parisian boutique owner Sam Rykiel, with whom she had two children, Nathalie and Jean-Philippe.

Sonia Rykiel, Sam Rykiel and their children in their apartment in the  mid 1960s.  Image PARISMATCH.COM

Sonia Rykiel, Sam Rykiel and their children Nathalie and in the mid 1960s. Image PARISMATCH.COM

While pregnant in 1962, Mrs. Rykiel was unable to find fashionable maternity garments, and resorted to making her own clothes in an attractive style: a long sleeved, slim fitting dress and sweater in knitted jersey that clung to the body like a second skin. Practical and modern, her knits were sexy, stylish, and extremely comfortable, and became an instant hit among her friends. Known as the ‘Poor Boy’ sweater, she began receiving commissions for her designs and soon garnered such interest that her husband began selling her clothes in his shop.

Sonia Rykiel working in her husband's boutique, Laura's, in 1967 (top left, right) and in 1965 (bottom). Images WWD/ROGER VIOLLET

Sonia Rykiel working in her husband’s boutique, Laura’s, in 1967 (top left, right) and in 1965 (bottom). Images WWD/ROGER VIOLLET

Mrs. Rykiel designed all kinds of knitwear between 1962 and 1968: playing with shapes, textures, bright colours and motifs to create daring new looks. She was the first modern designer to incorporate stripes into her designs, a pattern that became one of her signatures because “…on clothing they follow a woman’s movements.” At the time stripes were considered dated and dowdy, but she reinvented them for a younger, more fashionable set by pairing them with modern silhouettes and colouring them in bright rainbow shades. Everything she ever did was about enhancing the beauty of the body in motion, and she was always interested with how unusual fabrics — fur, wool, feathers, etc. — moved with women as they walked.

Sonia Rykiel's experiments with textures and movement playing out on the runway: (clockwise from top left) Spring 2008, Resort 2006, Fall 1998 and Fall 2007.  Images WWD/VOGUE.COM

Sonia Rykiel’s experiments with textures and movement playing out on the runway: (clockwise from top left) Spring 2008, Resort 2006, Fall 1998 and Fall 2007. Images WWD/VOGUE.COM

In December 1963 Mrs. Rykiel made history when Elle magazine featured one of her famous jumpers on it’s cover. It was the first time that a women’s magazine or fashion journal had ever featured prêt-à-porter on it’s cover, and as such it was a big sensation. It was the beginning of the Swinging 60s and the Parisian youth were entranced by the new style that was taking London by storm. The demand for Ms. Rykiel’s designs spread like wildfire across Paris and a younger, more modern clientele began flocking to Sam Rykiel’s boutique. Almost immediately Audrey Hepburn visited the shop and purchased fourteen sweaters in every colour, Brigitte Bardot and Sylvie Vartan were photographed wearing Sonia Rykiel jumpers, and icons like Anouk Aimée, Francoise Hardy, Catherine Deneuve and Lauren Bacall began collecting her work.

Early Sonia Rykiel covers: (from left) her history- making first cover- Francoise Hardy by Marc Hispard for Elle France December 1963, Britt Ekland by Gianni Penati for US Vogue April 1969 and Elle France April 1971 by Tony Kent. Images HOSTORIEDEMODE.ORG/VOGUE.COM/SONIA RYKIEL.COM

Early Sonia Rykiel covers: (from left) her history- making first cover- Francoise Hardy by Marc Hispard for Elle France December 1963, Britt Ekland by Gianni Penati for US Vogue April 1969 and Elle France April 1971 by Tony Kent. Images HOSTORIEDEMODE.ORG/VOGUE.COM/SONIA RYKIEL.COM

Demand for her garments grew so strong that she founded her own fashion house, the Sonia Rykiel Company, in 1965, and opened her first boutique on Paris’ Left Bank in 1968 (the same year that she divorced her husband). Further success followed and her business grew quickly. In 1969 she opened an in-store shop at Galeries Lafayette, and her clothes were soon picked up by Bloomingdale’s and Henri Bendel in New York.

Sonia Rykiel in her atelier in 1968. Image

Sonia Rykiel in her atelier in 1968. Image ROGER VIOLLET

In 1972 Ms. Rykiel was dubbed the “Queen of Knits” by Women’s Wear Daily, a title that was used throughout her career. She was one of the first designers to join the Chambre Syndicale as an exclusively ready- to- wear house and stage prêt-à-porter fashion shows. She was also the first luxury ready-to-wear designer to collaborate with mail order firms, partnering with French company 3 Suisses for a capsule collection in 1977. In time, she went on to collaborate with La Redoute and H&M, and was one of the first major designers to explore the idea of ‘affordable luxury.’

Sonia Rykiel in 1973 (top, right), with Kenzo Takada and Karl Lagerfeld, and in 1984 (bottom, fourth from right), with Jack Lang (seventh on left), French Minister of Culture, and her contemporaries: (from left) Kenzo Takada, Anne-Marie Beretta, Jean-Charles de Castelbajac, Chantal Thomass, Alix Gres, Yves Saint-Laurent, Sonia Rykiel, Issey Miyake, Pierre Berge and Emanuel Ungaro. Image WWD/CNN.COM/GETTY IMAGES

Sonia Rykiel in 1973 (top, right), with Kenzo Takada and Karl Lagerfeld, and in 1984 (bottom, fourth from right), with Jack Lang (seventh on left), French Minister of Culture, and her contemporaries: (from left) Kenzo Takada, Anne-Marie Beretta, Jean-Charles de Castelbajac, Chantal Thomass, Alix Gres, Yves Saint-Laurent, Sonia Rykiel, Issey Miyake, Pierre Berge and Emanuel Ungaro. Image WWD/CNN.COM/GETTY IMAGES

Over the next few years, she continued to work with knitwear, developing new techniques like inside-out stitching, no-hem finishings and unlined knits. She started trends that have endured to this very day, like printed slogan sweaters, quilted jackets and cropped knits. She has also been credited with the popularization of wearing black, a colour that she wore everyday. “My color is black,” she once told an American fashion editor, “And black, if it’s worn right, is a scandal…it’s indecent when well worn, intense and disturbing, striking and stops the eye.”

The runway of a 1975 show staged in the Sonia Rykiel atelier (top left), the designer working with a model in 1973 (top right) and 1975 (bottom).  Image JEAN- LUCE HURE/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK

The runway of a 1975 show staged in the Sonia Rykiel atelier (top left), the designer working with a model in 1973 (top right) and 1975 (bottom). Image JEAN- LUCE HURE/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK

Ms. Rykiel remained creative director of her company until her retirement in 2009. Although her daughter Nathalie replaced her as the company’s director and Julie de Libran became the head designer, Ms. Rykiel maintained an active part of the brand even after her retirement.

Sonia Rykiel taking her bow on the runway for her Spring 2002 (top), her Fall 1994 (centre) and Fall 1984 shows.  Image GETTY IMAGES

Sonia Rykiel taking her bow on her Spring 2002 runway. Image GETTY IMAGES/FRANCOIS GUILLOT/GERARD FOURE/AFP

Throughout her career, Ms. Rykiel experimented with every type of design- branching out into other ventures including children’s clothing, menswear, lingerie, accessories, fragrances, chinaware and chocolates. Along the way she also tried her hand at costume design and interior decorating. She published several books, many about fashion, but also wrote a collection of children’s stories and several novels that explored her thoughts on erotica, philosophy, feminism and life in general.

Sonia Rykiel's various ventures: (clockwise, from top left) Sonia Rykiel makeup by Lancôme, towels from the 2011 home collection, various pieces of costume jewelry, the 2009 Sonia Rykiel Barbie and the famous 'Canard Vibrant' sex toys from her 2011 collection.  Image LANCÔME.COM/STYLEFRIZZ.COM/ELLE UK/1STDIBS/SHOPSTYLE.COM/VESTIARECOLLECTION.COM/MATTEL.COM/DOITINPARIS.COM

Sonia Rykiel’s various ventures: (clockwise, from top left) Sonia Rykiel makeup by Lancôme, towels from the 2011 home collection, various pieces of costume jewelry, the 2009 Sonia Rykiel Barbie and the famous ‘Canard Vibrant’ sex toys from her 2011 collection. Image LANCÔME.COM/STYLEFRIZZ.COM/ELLE UK/1STDIBS/SHOPSTYLE.COM/VESTIARECOLLECTION.COM/MATTEL.COM/DOITINPARIS.COM

Sonia Rykiel was awarded many honours during her lifetime, including being appointed a Commandeur of the Légion d’honneur, a Commandeur de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres and a Grand Officer of the National Order of Merit.

Sonia Rykiel with former French Prime Minister Nicholas Sarkozy at the 2009 ceremony where she bacame a Commandeur of the Legion d'Honneur.  Image GETTY IMAGES/FRANCOISE GOIZE

Sonia Rykiel with former French Prime Minister Nicholas Sarkozy at the 2009 ceremony where she bacame a Commandeur of the Legion d’Honneur. Image GETTY IMAGES/FRANCOISE GOIZE

In 2012 Ms. Rykiel revealed that for the previous 15 years, she had been battling Parkinson’s disease, a progressive neurological disorder. She had kept her illness a secret- even from her family, until she could no longer hide the symptoms. Her death was directly caused by complications of the disease.

Sonia Rykiel by Elias for Garage Magzine December 2013.  Image GARAGE MAGAZINE

Sonia Rykiel by Elias for Garage Magzine December 2013. Image GARAGE MAGAZINE

Throughout her career Sonia Rykiel was likened to the great Coco Chanel because of her ability to liberate women from the constraints of traditional fashion. Just as Mademoiselle Coco eschewed corsets, high necks and uncomfortable clothing, Ms. Rykiel avoided the restrictive “New Look” style that had become the norm during the 1950s. Lean and sensuous, her garments placed great emphasis on the allure of the female form, bringing attention to natural curves without any excess paddings, linings or fuss. Her designs were practical, but sexy, and were meant to be lived in and worn numerous times. She was one of the few designers who actually understood how women wanted to dress and saw her garments as what they were meant to be- tools that service a woman’s life, not things that defined her. She never took design too seriously, and simply made clothes that she liked and wanted, garments that reflected her daily moods and her ever changing needs.

Looks from the runway: (clockwise from top left) Spring 1994, Spring 1976, Fall 1989, Fall 2007, Spring 2007, Spring 1975.  Image WWD/VOGUE.COM/JEAN- LUCE HURE/DIDIER DESTAL/GETTY IMAGES

Looks from the runway: (clockwise from top left) Spring 1994, Spring 1976, Fall 1989, Fall 2007, Spring 2007, Spring 1975. Image WWD/VOGUE.COM/JEAN- LUCE HURE/DIDIER DESTAL/GETTY IMAGES

Sonia Rykel reshaped women’s perception of luxury and freedom, and introduced an edgier approach to style that was unlike anything ever seen before. Before her, knitwear was usually homemade and was an ugly, chunky, unsexy affair. She introduced the notion of machine produced luxury knits in jersey, lurex and tinsel- blended knits, and she single-handedly transformed them into the fitted, feminine wardrobe staples we know (and love) today.

Rykiel Runways: (top) Spring 1989, (bottom) Spring 2011.  Image GAMMA RAY/VOGUE.COM/GETTY IMAGES

Rykiel Runways: (top) Spring 1989, (bottom) Spring 2011. Image GAMMA RAY/VOGUE.COM/GETTY IMAGES

“First I made a dress because I was pregnant and I wanted to be the most beautiful pregnant woman. Then I made a sweater because I wanted to have one that wasn’t like anyone else’s,” she told an interviewer in 2006s. “I don’t know if I’m perceived as being provocative, I suppose it’s an attitude that I’ve had since Day One. I am not swayed by anybody else. Who cares what they think?…I’m a fashion fraude. I never studied couture, I don’t know how to knit and still I became the queen of knitwear.”

Sonia Rykiel by Timothy Greenfield-Sanders, 1990.

Sonia Rykiel by Timothy Greenfield-Sanders, 1990. Image THEREDLIST.COM

She was a true individual, and and a living faunt of high design. She will be deeply missed.

Xx – Ana

Friday Fierceness!

“Lois de Saison (Season Laws)”- Vogue Paris September 2016

Embellished jumpsuit: Philipp Plein, Puffer Jacket: Acne Studios, Jewelry: Repossi. Image VOGUE PARIS/PARTICK DEMARCHELIER

Model: Julie Hoomans
Photographer: Patrick Demarchelier
Stylist: Suzanne Koller
Hair: Duffy
Makeup: Aaron de Mey

SIDEWALK SAUNTER

I love this shot! This stylish young lady looks both vintage and modern with her cool bob and bangs. What a way to frame such a great face!
Copenhagen Fashion Week, August 2016. Image- vogue.co.uk

Hi all! It’s been a little while! Hope you’ve been enjoying your summer as much as I have.

This guy’s head-to-toe in patterns and colors and I really like it. If you notice, they’re all in muted off blue/ off purple shades, with the truly bright color peeking out in the periwinkle blue of his socks. Yes, his pants could be tailored a little better, but as a look, I like it.
Munbai. Image- wearabout.wordpress.com

For this Sidewalk Saunter, I’ve decided to highlight some later summer looks that don’t really look like “summer” looks. These are outfits that are great for the occasional chilly night or not swelteringly hot day. Looks for traveling (see Orlando Bloom) or running around getting things done (see the NY beauty in the white shirtdress and Adidas kicks). I think they’re all pretty smart!

Orlando Bloom walking through an airport looking cool and comfortable. His bomber jacket’s great (I think St Laurent?)!
LA. Image- getty images

I’m not a huge fan of this girl’s tennis shoes and socks, but I can’t hate it because she literally exudes nonchalant cool.
Copenhagen Fashion Week, August 2016. Image- vogue.co.uk

Great jacket, great shoes, great grey t-shirt, great pants… hell, even great hair. Good work sir.
London. Image- Jonathan Price for gq-magazine.co.uk

This guy’s definitely feeling chilly, but looks good with his well styled jacket and striped shirt.
London. Image- Jonathan Pryce for gq-magazine.co.uk

How a stylish woman runs her errands in NYC. Cool and comfortable with a great bag, she looks great!
New York. Image- facebook.com

India’s not the 1st place to come to mind when you think of stylish Western clothing, but there’s a huge group of trendsetters over there! Look at this man. Every piece he’s wearing is cool and they all work together. Those pants… I wouldn’t mind finding out where to get a pair.
Mumbai. Image- wearabout.wordpress.com

Ana’s always going on about great accessories adding to your look, and I think this small Louis Vuitton bag is a great example of that. Really simple, really sleek and very modern with the chain placement and updated monogram. It’s easy to see why this is a popular style among the fashion crowd.
Copenhagen Fashion Week, August 2013. Image- vogue.co.uk

My best,

Estevan

Friday Fierceness!

“Cara Go Lightly”- Elle US September 2016

Dress: Yves Saint Laurent, Stockings: Wolford, Jewelry: Messika. Image ELLE US/ TERRY TSISOLIS

Model: Cara Delevingne
Photographer: Terry Tsiolis
Stylist: Samira Nasr
Hair: Mara Roszak
Makeup: Jeanine Lobell

Friday Fierceness!

“Big Chic”- Vogue Germany September 2016

Blouse: Jil Sander. Image VOGUE GERMANY/PATRICK DEMARCHELIER/INSTAGRAM

Model: Frederikke Sofie
Photographer: Patrick Demarchelier
Stylist: Sarajane Hoare
Hair: James Pecis
Makeup: Gucci Westman

Dress: Yves Saint Laurent. Image VOGUE GERMANY/PATRICK DEMARCHELIER/INSTAGRAM

Image VOGUE GERMANY/PATRICK DEMARCHELIER

Friday Fierceness!

“Athletic Girl/ When Sport Meets Fashion”- Vogue Italia August 2016

(On her) Bodysuit: Giorgio Armani, Shoes: Lanvin, (on him) Bodysuit: Hood by Air, Shoes: Everlast. Image VOGUE ITALIA/STEVEN KLEIN

Models: Lara Stone & Andres Sanjuan
Photographer: Steven Klein
Stylist: Patti Wilson
Makeup: Diane Kendal
Hair: Shon

Jewel of the Month

The Habsburg Parure- a four piece suite of peridot and diamond jewels by Köchert

The Habsburg Peridot Parure by Köchert. Image ROYALJEWELS.COM

What a beauty! This parure is the only known royal suite that implements the brightly-coloured semiprecious peridot as it’s centerpiece. Created by jewellers AE Köchert in the mid- 1820s for the Royal Family of Austria (the famed Habsburg’s), the suite is composed of a bandeau- style tiara, a pair of ornate earrings, a necklace with seven pendants and a dramatic devant de corsage (large brooch or stomacher). Done in traditional Georgian jewelry style, the suite is composed of enormous deep olive green peridots set in a scrolling frame studded with cushion and rose- cut white diamonds, all set in silver and yellow gold. The tiara is designed as a band of seven graduated clusters of floral and foliate scrollwork, with five large step- cut peridots forming the centers of the middle rosettes with two diamond flowers at each end. The necklace features a graduated chain of ten peridot and diamond clusters with a hanging fringe of seven teardrop- shaped peridot and diamond pendants. These pendants are removable and can also be worn upright along the top frame of the tiara. The suite’s girandole- style earrings and corsage ornament mimic the tiara’s delicate floral motif, and both are designed as peridot and diamond clusters surmounted by sprays of diamond flowers and leaves. The flowers on the earrings are detachable and support teardrop- shaped pendants of diamonds and gold with peridot swing centers, while the floral clusters on the brooch elaborately border it’s emerald- cut peridot center and support three small hanging peridot and diamond teardrops.

The two variations of the Habsbrg Peridot Tiara, with the seven pendants from the necklace (top) and without the attachments in it’s traditional bandeau style. Image ROYALJEWELS.COM

Originally made for the wedding of Princess Henrietta of Nassau-Weilburg to Archduke Charles, Duke of Teschen, this suite is most often associated with Princess Isabella von Croÿ, (wife of the couple’s grandson, Archduke Frederick) as she was the first lady be seen wearing the entire parure. Archduchess Isabella was famously photographed wearing the full suite at the 1916 coronation of Emperor Charles I of Austria-Hungary, an event that turned out to be one of the last great Habsburg celebrations.

Archduchcess Isabella of Croÿ photographed wearing the Peridot Parure to Emperor Charles’ coronation ball in 1916 (left) and a painting of the Archduchess at the event that was completed at a later date. Image THECOURTJEWELLER.COM/DINASTIAS.FOROGRATIS.ES

The Archduchess’s family kept the peridot suite after her September 1931 death, but it was sold a few years later, after the death of the Archduke in December 1936. The sale took place in early 1937 to Count Johannes Coudenhove-Kalergi, a Czech nobleman, who purchased the parure for his wife Countess Lilly. It then passed by descent to their daughter Countess Maria.

Two other photographs of Archduchcess Isabella at Emperor Charles’ coronation ball in 1916 offering a view of her parure from the front and a close-up of her jewels in semi-profile. Image THECOURTJEWELLER.COM/DINASTIAS.FOROGRATIS.ES

Countess Maria Electa von Coudenhove-Kalergi chose to live a simple life in the United States, residing in California and known only as Maria Calergi. The Countess never wore her inherited jewels, preferring to keep them tucked away inconspicuously in a safety deposit box for the duration of her life. When she died in 2000, her estate administrators were shocked to find the jewels in her Los Angeles vault, wrapped in tea towels and kitchen paper. The parure was in perfect condition and was accompanied by a packet of documents that included descriptions and illustrations from their 1937 sale catalogue.

Illustrations of the Habsburg Peridot Parure and other jewels from the 1937 auction, copied from the Maria Coudenhove-Kalergi’s copy of the catalogu listing. Image SOTHEBY’S

Sotheby’s London auctioned the Habsburg peridots in 2001, and they were bought by famous New York- based jewelry firm, Fred Leighton. The firm often loans jewels to clients for public appearances and the peridot parure was no exception, with comedian and television personality (and Queen) Joan Rivers famously borrowing the suite’s necklace and earrings for the 2004 Golden Globes Awards.

Joan Rivers wearing the Habsburg necklace and earrings to the 2004 Golden Globe Awards. Image FASHIONISTA.COM

Although the whereabouts of the necklace and tiara are not publicly known today, Brazilian philanthropist Lily Safra purchased at least a part of the parure at some point after 2001, since the suite’s earrings and brooch were among a selection of her jewels placed up for auction in May 2012. Sold by Christie’s in Geneva to an anonymous buyer, the two pieces fetched more than $170,000 for charity.

Catalogue photos of the Habsburg earrings and corsage ornament from their 2012 sale. Image CHRISTIE’S AUCTION HOUSE

I adore green gemstones, and I’ve always has a soft spot for peridots. Although I prefer stones with a brighter colour than those used in this suite, I’ve always been fond of the Habsburg parure since these particular peridots are of such fine quality, colour, and size. In the past, the stones have actually been mistaken for emeralds due to their deep colour, especially since they greatly resemble those in Empress Marie Louise of France’s famous emerald and diamond parure.

Promotional photographs taken prior to Sotheby’s 2001 sale showing the Parure’s necklace and earrings and the tiara worn without it’s frame as a belt (although why anyone would wear it like this…) (top left), and a Sotheby’s employee wearing the full suite in the traditional way (top right and bottom). Image SOTHEBYS.COM/TOPFOTO

It’s always rare for royal ladies to use coloured gemstones (especially semiprecious ones) in their jewelry and it really is a pity that the suite has been split up, with the whereabouts of it’s two most famous pieces are generally unknown. To me, this is one of the loveliest and unusual suites of royal jewelry ever made. I hope that this parure is reunited in full someday soon, and that it’s owner actually wears the jewels. They’re too beautiful to be locked away!

Xx- Ana